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Is your family, well… a symphony?

As a teen, I loved the symphony.

When others my age were going to concerts, I was going to the symphony.

In the 1970s the Toronto Symphony played at Massey Hall. For $2.00 you could buy a rush seat, the left-overs, just before a concert, way up in God’s country seating.

At intermission, if you spied a vacant seat closer to the stage, you might want to sneak down and grab it. I did.

It may have been there I learned to listen.

I would listen for each instrument’s part in the symphony.

As one instrument played higher and faster, another might go lower and slower. Yet, combined, it created the beautiful music. Each was important to the combined sound.

Families are like symphonies. Couple are like duets. Intertwining are their lives. Combined, a symphony. Each part contributes to the whole. Each part must be heard and recognized.

To be able to hear each instrument uniquely and in concert together….

Each, so unique, individually and combined.

My job, where possible, bring greater harmony.

Harmony, no two the same, yet belonging together. Neither drowning out the other.

A symphony.


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I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

39 Years and Not a Person The Same

It 39 years.

That’s how long I have been working with people now – 39 years.

It never grows old, although admittedly, sometimes tough.

People tell me I have seen it all, but here’s the thing. I haven’t.

With 39 years of practice, although some face similar things, similar is not the same.

Each person is so unique. Each person’s circumstances are a mixture of their culture, faith, upbringing, health, community, education, experiences and more.

By the time you add at least those factors to the mix of our make-up, no two could ever be the same.

So with that, I have learned to listen. I have also learned the need to ask questions.

It is only by asking questions and learning about the person, their family, their life, their experiences, we can hopefully be a bit helpful.

It is in the untangling of all those factors, seeing connections and disconnections we may come to discover what may be at issue to distress. Then, we may be helpful. Not always, helpful, but always hopeful.

I am still learning at 39 years in.

Each person is my teacher.

Each person. No two the same.

With that, I am eager to continue and serve.


Want more? Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

Conflict Over Covid

This pandemic has created a divide between many. Some within their own families. Some affecting children between separated parents.

Tensions are heightened further when there are those with risk factors seeking to remain safe among those whose beliefs are quite contrary to science and public health.

Patience may be lost. Discussion turns to anger and hostility. It becomes totally personal.

When locked in such dispute, choices appear and indeed may be binary. Stay, go. Be together or not. Remain connected or disconnect.

One parent recently told me they had their kids stay for two weeks of quarantine with the other parent when that other parent went visiting friends and family with the kids. Personal health issues were of concern and couldn’t be compromised. It was a difficult choice. The kids did return after that.

In other instances these differences seem to be used intentionally as tools of manipulation for parenting time.

Then there are those seeking to plan family celebrations. Attend? How so? What of precautions?

In the end though, it becomes each person’s choice how to respond and how much risk they wish to take.

There are measures, some perhaps inconvenient, that the one seeking to manage risk can take when others don’t.

Those measures are typically within your control alone and don’t require cooperation of the other.

When there is no cooperation and cooler heads are unavailable, that is what’s left.

We sometimes can only do what is within our control to do.

Beyond the illness, death and mental health issues, fractured relationships are another casualty of this pandemic.

That too is a reality for some to be mourned.

We can only do what we can do when others don’t. Fighting doesn’t make it better.

With that and a retreat, then we can hope that with the passage of time we can reconnect.

Staying peaceful leaves less to heal.

Let peace prevail when agreement doesn’t.


Want more? Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

Survey Says! Top Strategies Working From Home with School-Aged Kids During the Pandemic

Yesterday I asked my Facebook followers about strategies that parents working from home are using to manage with their school-aged kids.

At the time of this report there have been 85 comments that I copied into a word format that comprised 17 pages and some 7,300 words. Herein is my summary:

————————-

As per the comments, each family’s situation was unique.

While there were many families with similarly aged children, each family differed between how many children were at home, whether it was a single parent or two parent household, who worked when and how many hours, level of income and access to resources outside of one’s in-home family (extended kin and friends). Comments also reflected differences in available space, number of computers and quality of Internet.

The range of differences make it clear that there can never be a one-size-fits-all approach to meeting the needs of parents and children during this pandemic.

It was also clear that what worked for one family clearly didn’t work for another family. Some folks were coping, some just getting by and a few in despair.

With that it remains important to recognize that if offering advice based on what does work for oneself, the advice may not at all fit for another family, even if some similarities between families remain. So, if offering advice, it will remain important to withhold judgement based on follow through and helpfulness.

While professionals often tout the use of structure and routine and that was voiced many times throughout the comments, it was also clear that flexibility and operating more in the moment better served others. There was a sense for many that letting go of control and easing expectations best served their families.

Things that parents found helpful generally included:

  • Pre-planning, yet remaining flexible. This is more of a mindset that many found helpful. If there was a firm or rigid expectation that things go as planned, it was more often met with issues. With that many parents acknowledged that their ability to set aside expectations, despite plans, better served theirs and their children’s mood and behavior.
  • In terms of pre-planning, several parents commented on preparing lunches and snacks as they had when school was in-person. That having food prepared helped keep the day more organized and on track.
  • Those parents who, in a sense, experimented, often found strategies that better served their family. If something wasn’t working, rather than imposing the same strategy with more intensity, they pivoted to try something else, and this often helped ease tensions.
  • For those parents of greater financial means, some relied upon a nanny or tutor to support their children during the day with schoolwork. There were others who used extended kin or friends to trade support with. In one instance a parent reflected on the use of her parent to “babysit” a school-aged child over Zoom.
  • Many parents found that giving less value to the notion of completing schoolwork and more value to mental health found hat shift in thinking improved matters for their family. The frame of reference helped set more reasonable expectations and plans for the school day.
  • One intriguing strategy was to have today’s schoolwork based on the studies of the previous day. Knowing what was expected in full and having access to the full lesson plan helped this one family better meet the academic expectation.
  • Several parents differentiated between synchronous and asynchronous learning which is somewhat similar, yet different to the previous point. Some parents found that having to follow on-line with teacher and class was too draining for some children and that their fatigue would show up with limited capacity to cope and more acting out behavior. By taking work off-line, there was actually less distraction and better ability to concentrate which in turn facilitated more work completion.

If there was one comment most common, it may have been that parents have learned from the previous two lock-downs and now in the third, here in Ontario, they are somewhat more relaxed with themselves and with lower expectations for academic achievement.

There was clear consensus that mental health mattered more over performance and completion and that over the passage of time, when things have settled, children will have the opportunity to catch up.

I sum that up as less fear and more faith despite the obvious challenges.

As always, please be mindful of self-care and the needs of others. Reach out, reach across and reach in. Doing this together with mutual support can mean the difference.


Want more? Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

Social Narcissism

People, priorities privilege, power and social narcissism.

We all understand narcissism, that view of the world that has oneself at the centre. The one who rails against those who don’t share their view of themself as always right, most important. The narcissist.

Well, what about societal narcissism? What about a swath of society that advances their needs and wants above other societal groups and when hard pressed, controls those other groups through political policies and agents of control?

The narcissism of the individual is self defeating.

For the individual, their narcissism affects and undermines their relationships. Once seen for who they are, exposed, it is difficult to carry on a relationship with them. The clarity of the lack of give and take in the lop-sided universe of the self-absorbed and selfish eventually has others distance or leave or if stay, be unwell. Thus the interests of the narcissist are eventually thwarted by their own undoing.

On a larger level, social narcissism is also self-defeating.

As a swath of society seeks to hold access to greater resources and views success as the accumulation of the most resources, those upon whom they depend to gather those resources and submit to their self-absorbed desires likewise go unwell. There is a point though that when so unwell, those without power can no longer produce for those who would exploit to amass even more resources. Here we are in a pandemic.

Some, those who advance the needs and wants of their social group at the expense of others have gone so far as to now put themselves at risk. Hospitals are overflowing. Places of recreation are unavailable. Now the health of the mainstream and privileged class, the social narcissists are put at risk too. Favored places of recreation have become unavailable. They are inconvenienced.

Experienced is the self-defeating outcome of social narcissism. They cannot amass resources when those who provide are so sick they can no longer do so. They cannot enjoy access to preferred recreation and freedoms.

So, those who may have been small “c” conservatives are turning on this government.

They turn on the government not with due concern for those who have been subject to exploitation and oppression, but because they can no longer carry on as before. They are now personally affected. It’s about them. This is social narcissism.

So their focus remains not on those who are truly most affected by the pandemic. Not on those who must choose between providing for their families or ill health and death.

No. Their focus remain on their losses of convenience or their own health given the strained resources of a health care system now caring for predominantly folks of the BIPOC community and/or lower income and/or women.

Social narcissism is revealed by this pandemic.

And who shall rail against this exposé? Who may take issue with a view that discusses social narcissism? Might it be those to whom this view applies? Such would be consistent with the link to individual narcissism.

And so we also see those who in their same breath express concern for those most truly affected by this pandemic and for those only affected when those so worse off affects themselves. This is to be taken as concern. However, it may just be a societal narcissistic concern. We as a society or group of priviledged individuals may only express concern for your well-being when ours is affected in turn.

From this perspective, a non social narcissistic concern wouldn’t have to see oneself put out to hold the health and well being off all societal members as paramount. So, we are not all in the same boat. Some are more affected than others. For a society to be truly healthy, all must be healthy, valued and respected. Meagre responses to those truly affected eventually exposes this dark underbelly of society, societal narcissism.

People, priorities privilege, power and social narcissism. How do you want to be seen within?

How will you prioritize or equivocate?

Will you take a stand for the impact on others in need or only when you are affected?

How shall our society be known?

I ask that we of privilege share, that we use our voice for those who are disenfranchised, oppressed, exploited, discriminated against.

I ask that we see them as us and act as we would want for ourselves and family.

I wish for a society that values all.

Inclusive.


Want more? Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

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Learning to Use The Potty?

Thinking of the current crop of little kids who are in the midst of toilet training.

All this attention on control of one’s bodily function. All these parents for whom the child’s control would serve the parent.

So, two secrets to successful outcomes:

1) Readiness. It is a difficult skill to manage for the child yet unaware of feeling and monitoring and being aware of the pressure of full bladder and bowel.

So, consider the process as beginning with awareness and self-monitoring. That can start with you sharing your own awareness prior to toileting and simply commenting on it as you look to relieve yourself.

Think of this as priming towards readiness.

2) A sense of indifference yet pleasure with the developing skills.

The key here is to reduce the element of big expectation or control the child’s experiences of you. A more passive outlook has the child thinking of their own body and toileting rather than having to manage your expectation.

However, with the child’s skill development of removing or putting on clothing, telling the parent of the feeling of pressure – needing to toilet, sitting patiently upon a toilet or potty, evacuating, well, then the parent should comment upon the accomplishment positively yet understatedly.

Large rewards, as opposed to our social approval or recognition can develop a sense in the child that they can withhold meeting an expectation until delivery of a tangible and sizeable reward. This is a negative consequence of too great a reliance on external rewards.

So, “Look at you. That must feel good. I’m pleased for you.” “You must feel more comfortable now and you can play more easier. I am sure that feels better.” The accomplishment serves the child.

Lastly, these are just some considerations in the world of potty use. There are many.

Do consider what is inadvertently taught or expected by any approach taken.

Do also recognize that while you may read a particular approach, your child won’t have received the memo and every child is different.

The variability of age at which kids develop these skills is remarkable. Try not to compare. It won’t help and is actually meaningless.

Patience is your friend.


Want more? Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

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Breaking the Punishment-Misbehavior Cycle

What if today’s misbehavior is the left over resentment for yesterday’s punishment?

When parents apply harsh or long lasting consequences, kids may be resentful. That can come out as passive-aggressive behavior or overtly aggressive or oppositional behavior.

Unfortunately, that often leads parents to escalating the consequences, leaving them to wonder why it doesn’t work along with tense and fractured relationships with their kids. On a go forward basis, rather than thinking of punishment, think of learning.

How can the situation that you would have punished the child for be turned into something that allows for a learning experience?

How do you think that makes your brother feel when you do that?

How can we make this better?

What can we do in the future if you are feeling this way?

How are we going to fix this or make it better?

This shift in managing behavior helps maintain the connection between parent and child. It is through that positive connection we can then teach more and have influence with regard to the child’s choices and behavior. If you are already in a resentment, more misbehavior, more punishment cycle, you can get out of it.

Comment on it to the child. Ask the child how you both got here and consider suggestions to get out of it.

This can help the child see you as empathetic, considerate and in control of your own emotions and behavior. Instead of resentment, that breeds trust and caring. With that, both parent and child learn.


Want more? Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

Tilt. Towards Care.

Where does the anger and fear go?

How does it flow?

From the tips of our finger we aim at that which we determine the cause.

Our children watching.

For many containment is gone.

Vitriol dances from our tongues.

In the meantime, hardship.

Therein I weep.

Society’s shifted.

The axis has changed.

I tilt to the side to correct.

I seek for compassion.

People are stuck on loss.

Hoarding. Hoarding and we worry about ourselves.

Oh to give again and see the wonder and beauty of care.

The joy of others receiving when thought forgotten.

There. There is where I want to be.

I want to be they who gives with abandon to see those who receive in joy.

There is where I shall tilt.

There I shall find myself and a better world.

Transcend the vitriol, ignore the finger.

Care instead for another.

There is the world we seek.

Today I tilt towards it.


Want more? Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

Counseling Isn’t Always the Answer

The person appears depressed, unable to even get out of bed.

They are sent to counseling and the counselor looks for issues in their life that can contribute to their depression.

The counselor discovers a few things that although upsetting are not really all that big.

However, the counselor does what the counselor does and has the person dig deep into their feelings with a belief that those issues must be at the heart of their depression.

Now the person is disheartened believing those things thought previously to be minor, are significant. The depression remains.

Counseling is seen as ineffective and/or the person resistant to change. Service by that counselor is discontinued.

Then, another counselor.

This counselor, rather than assuming the matter to be psychological, asks a number of questions to explore on a broader scale, the wellbeing and life of the person.

The counselor asks questions wondering about the person’s physical health, mental health, relationships, family dynamics and difficult life experiences.

There is little to suggest there are any particular experiences or relationships issues to account for the symptoms of being unable to get out of bed.

What is left is a biological basis to the behavior. The counselor wonders about a medical condition.

The counselor suggests a medical assessment of the person that include complete blood work.

Did you know there are a number of medical conditions that can provide symptoms that masquerade as depression?

Very low iron, underactive thyroid, vitamin D deficiency, type 2 diabetes, concussion are just a few of the conditions that can present with symptoms consistent with depression.

The counselor, rather than providing counseling sends the person for a complete medical assessment.

A medical basis to their symptoms is discovered and treated.

The symptoms subside.

I am that other counselor. I am the one who after asking many questions, has sent people to their doctor, not for antidepressant medication, but medical assessments to determine if there is a biological basis to their symptoms.

We as counselors must ask questions and seek to differentiate cause and not just treat symptoms.

For that, a bio-psycho-social approach.

This, again yesterday.


Want more? Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

George Floyd – Because Black Lives Matter

Watching reports and new videos of the George Floyd trial.

Let me begin by saying, I am a white man of privilege.

As a white man of privilege what has transpired, what I see, what I hear is fully beyond my experience, even given my 65 years of life.

Having said that, I cannot help but feel for those who are Black, for those where this is their lived experience, for those who must worry about themselves, partners, parents and children who may find themselves interfacing with police, let alone facing any disadvantage based on color.

Following this trial, I cannot help but feel and worry for those who will be retraumatized, reliving the abject racism, power imbalances and abuses of power based upon color.

Do know I find all of this abhorrent.

Do know that when I say, Black Lives Matter, I do so without reservation and without a false equivalence to any or other persons. We must understand that systemically Black, other persons of color and Indigenous peoples have been systematically oppressed and discriminated against.

My saying Black Lives Matter is to recognize these facts and to say as a white man, I do what I can to stand in support of equity and inclusion. I also extend my apology for my ignorance of history and promise to continue to learn more about life and history through your life and lens so as to limit and respond to my yet to be discovered unconscious bias.

Your lives matter to me.

Black Lives Matter.


Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.