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Addressing a Serious Concern with the School Principal

I received a frantic phone call from a mother. Her daughter in Senior Kindergarten had been fondled aggressively by another girl in the classroom.

When the mom discovered the fact, she soothed her daughter and spoke to the teachers the following day.

The mother was concerned that the teachers hadn’t taken the matter as seriously as they should and wondered about next steps. She didn’t know what to do.

I suggested she speak with the school Principal although not in an accusatory manner, but informationally. The challenge in this conversation for the mother was in managing her own upset so that the Principal could concentrate on the message.

I received this text message (printed with permission) advising of the outcome:

I went in like you suggested and the principal and vice principal ushered me in and talked with me.

I explained everything like you said including how I was also concerned about the little girl who did it. They agreed and told me they are investigating and are keeping a close eye on..her parents are also going for a meeting.

I explained I didn’t like being fluffed off by the teachers and I started to say “The teachers claimed they always have eyes on them” and he finished my sentence by saying “but you and I both know that’s not possible”.

I explained how in our family we closely guard our children’s Internet access and even television and that this behavior was not something we take lightly and how we are very confident it will never happen again.

He told me he started a safety plan and has been checking on our daughter slyly (he doesn’t want her to feel likes she’s in trouble or being watched). He also explained he knows this must be devastating for us as he has daughters too. I feel better now and he said he will keep me in the loop and gave me his work cell number for if there is ever another issue.

I had also offered some guidance about managing her daughter who was distraught and as a result, acting out a bit. I wondered if her behavior settled down. The mother advised:

Yes actually it has! She’s acting more like herself.  Thank you so much.

Good ending. Pleased to be of service.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue. I am available in person and by Skype. Costs are posted on each webpage describing my services.

If you found this blog of service, please share it with the links below.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

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Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas and Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships

Counseling – The Value is Your Well Being

I see people in the comfort of my home and we have a medium size dog, a cock-a-poo.

This is the first dog my wife and I ever owned. Kugle’s good behavior and our ability to train him didn’t come naturally. We really didn’t know how to train him.

Because we needed help, we went to McCann Dogs – a reputable dog training school. We went with our dog. We trained our dog as they trained us.

While we could have satisfied ourselves with just the introductory puppy class, we went through their entire program over the course of about a year and at a cost of about $1,500.00.

We realized that the more we invested in him as a puppy and young dog, we would have a more manageable and well mannered dog for the rest of his life.

As a result, Kugle is remarkably well-mannered. Kugle lays down when people enter our home and must receive our permission before greeting. We respect that not everyone is a dog lover and others may have allergies, although this breed is less allergenic. With permission, Kugle enthusiastically makes his greeting. People are amazed how he awaits permission and follows instruction.

Although some have spent more, on average most people typically spend less on counseling with me than we spent to be trained with our dog. However, people are often reluctant to attend counseling because of the cost.

I can only tell you that while no counselor is always helpful to everyone, we are helpful to most and I encourage you to consider counseling as an investment in yourself, your relationship, your family, your children. If you are concerned about yourself or a loved one or a relationship, please do seek help.

Value yourself and your relationship enough to figure out how to better manage or cope or get along or improve behavior. This is your investment in you.

Kugle is a star. On a weekly basis we take him to a local seniors’ residence where he spreads the joy as a certified therapy dog through St. John Ambulance, Therapy Dog Program. He now has more than 300 visits to his credit.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue. I am available in person and by Skype. Costs are posted on each webpage describing my services.

If you found this blog of service, please share it with the links below.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

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Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas and Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships

Out of Control and Pseudomature Teens

It seems to go hand in hand; Out of control teens who can argue a point to death, enough to put their parents on the defensive.

Objectively, the teen is drinking, doing drugs, engaging in risky sexual behavior and otherwise, just hanging out. School is not a priority, nor is working. The parents are distressed about the situation and seem helpless in the face of the teen’s rationalizations or threats of running away.

Not uncommonly, there is a history of limited expectations or follow through by the parents. Now that things are so out of control, there is a call for help.

Typically though the call comes from the parents and they are seeking their teen to change.

From the teen’s perspective, there are happy just the way things are. And why shouldn’t they be? No responsibility and a lifestyle that is geared mostly to having fun. The teen doesn’t want to change a thing.

The parents however want everything to change. It is the parents who are in distress. They worry about their teen’s lack of responsibility and the risks inherent in their behavior. They want their teen to stop drinking, stop doing drugs, stop hanging with the “wrong crowd”, go to school and get a job. However, what parents must realize that for their teen to change, the parents must change first.

Until the parents hold their teen accountable to reasonable parental expectations, change is unlikely. However, parents feel like they are held hostage. As the teen protests against newly imposed expectations, in the face of prior freedom, they at best complain and at worse fight back. Their protesting behavior can be verbal and even physical. They will try to argue, guilt their parents, threaten their property or person and threaten to run away. In the face of the teen’s escalation, many parents again acquiesce and the teen says, “I’ve got ‘em”. And they do.

What parents need to know is that when their son or daughter is so out of control, yet arguing as if they know everything, this is just “pseudomaturity” – pretend maturity, not real maturity. These teens really have no idea about the dangerousness of their behavior and the risk to their future life. They do not have the years of experience on which to draw. Parents must remember that being good at arguing does not make them right. Further, when teens are so out of control, there will be risks when trying to curtail certain behaviors in favor of redirecting to appropriate behavior. Hence parents may need support when trying to turn around an out of control teen. The purpose of support is to help mitigate risk and help parents stay the course even in view of an escalation of behavior as the teen protests. The teen must be told that if they become violent, aggressive or destructive, police will be called as such behavior will not be tolerated or excused. Parents may even have to accept that their son or daughter may leave home or at least fail to return home. However, upon their return, parents then must be clear as to new house rules and expectations or otherwise consider directing their teen to a youth shelter.

The message to the teen is that inappropriate behavior and lack of meaningful productivity is no longer accepted.

Throughout, parents must also develop and exhibit appropriate compassion and provide guidance and direction. It is one thing to tell a son or daughter what not to do. It is quite another to then tell them what to do and out of control teens need both. So as parents limit some behaviors, they should at the same time help the teen engage in pro-social healthy activities, particularly those that are inherently fun. Teens should be directed towards enticing extra-curricular activities that promote skill building. They can also be directed to volunteer activity that is reflective of their interests. As inappropriate activities are curtailed yet replaced with reasonable activities, the teen has a chance to have appropriate fun, generally in a supervised activity where there is an opportunity for self-development. As the new activities and behaviors take hold, the problematic behavior and pseudomaturity can give way to healthy adolescent development.

Just hang onto your hat though. The process takes courage and perseverance on the part of the parents who must change first! The first few weeks are definitely the hardest and most important. Withdraw and you know where your teen is heading. Hold on through the rough patch and you may stand a chance.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue. I am available in person and by Skype.

If you found this blog of service, please share it with the links below and/or download with this link.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

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Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas and Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships

The Real Secret to Success

Something people don’t know about me is that I struggled with school and as a result, was a bit of a late bloomer. In fact, I didn’t even complete the high school degree that would have led me to university. If not for music, I probably wouldn’t have even stayed in high school long enough to complete the diploma that would grant me access to college.

After a year of selling shoes, my girlfriend of the time told me that if our relationship were to continue, I would need to get an education. I attended a community college and took audio-visual techniques, which really meant learning about photography and video equipment.  During that first semester I learned the basics of writing an essay, something I hadn’t learned in all of high school. I also took an elective in psychology. I found less interest in my major and more interest in the psychology course.

As a result, I parlayed community college into an admission to university as a mature student. Now I was at York University with a major in psychology.

My first essay in university earned me a bright red “D” and the comment that I had a serious writing problem.

I asked the professor for help. He suggested I read Hemmingway and copy his style of short sentences (mine were all run on). Not one to turn away good advice, I did as suggested. My marks quickly improved to a “B” and at times “B+”.

In second year university I was taking a course in psycholinguistics (the study of language development in children). I was quickly failing, not because I didn’t understand the psychology part, but because I didn’t understand the basics of language, grammar to be exact.

I approached the prof (Dr. Robert Fink). He was a great guy who made me feel comfortable. I explained my problem and he loaned me a grade 10 text book on grammar.

I dutifully went home to read. I was dumbfounded. I couldn’t make sense of what I was reading.

Somewhat embarrassed, I returned to Professor Fink the following day and explained my situation.

Without hesitation he took down another grammar book from his shelf. This time it was a grade 8 text with a maroon cover called “Grammar is Important”. This was a very basic instructional book. It had two-word sentences like “John runs”. It explained that John was the subject and runs was the predicate. The book went on to explain the basics of grammar like nouns, verbs, subject, object, etc. It was as if I missed grade 8 grammar and without that basic knowledge, I wouldn’t have passed his course in psycholinguistics. I think I got a B+.

I graduated university with a Specialized Honours BA in Psychology. I managed a B+ average. I loved psychology and so applied to graduate school to become a psychologist. I applied to 5 schools of clinical psychology and was rejected at 5 schools of clinical psychology.

I got a job in a group home instead. I was working with severely developmentally compromised youth. It was there I met the social worker. I had never heard of social work before. She explained her role working with families. To me, it sounded like my dream job.

I applied to only one school of social work and that was at the University of Toronto. I was granted a conditional acceptance. I was missing a prerequisite that if obtained, I would be allowed entry into the school.

The course I required was in Canadian political science.

I applied to York University for an entry course and was accepted as a part time summer student.

I was expecting lectures on the Canadian parliament. I thought I would hear about the three political parties of the time. I was dead wrong.

The lecturer had an interest in Marxist-Leninist theory. My eyes glassed over during that first lecture. My mind wandered to my conditional acceptance. I saw it slipping away.

I approached the professor after class. I explained my attendance in his course. I asked his permission to alter the course requirements. Instead of two essays on the established course content, I asked if I could address the politics of social services in Canada. I promised that if he granted my request I would never become a political scientist, but that I would become a good social worker.

He was amazing. He agreed as long as I would also sit the final exam. I needed to get a B+ in this course to use it to receive my conditional acceptance to the social work program at the University of Toronto. I was grateful and I was petrified about the exam.

I wrote the 2 essays as negotiated. I attended every class and read all the material. Neither the classes nor the materials sunk in or made any sense to me. I sat the final exam. I froze.

I know I wrote basic gibberish in answer to an array of essay questions. There is no way I could have passed. I saw my conditional acceptance drift away.

I eventually received my grade for that course. I received a B+.

Since then, I became the social worker I sought to become. Courts in Ontario have deemed me to be an expert in Social Work. As for my writing difficulties, I have since authored more than 500 columns for our city newspaper, some 300 articles, some 200 blog posts, 2 books and chapters in several books.

I feel successful in my endeavors.

I credit my success to only one thing: Asking for help when help was needed and accepting the help that was offered. That is the real secret to success.

I continue to ask for help and accept help that is offered to this day.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue. I am available in person and by Skype.

If you found this blog of service, please share it with the links below.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

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Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas and Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships

It’s Difficult for Many People to go to Counseling

Counseling remains a viable strategy to cope with or change issues affecting one’s life. However, there are often many hurdles ahead of attending. Those hurdles are related to fears, misconceptions and even horror stories about counseling.

Fears include being labeled crazy or bad as well as fear of others learning you are in counseling. Misconceptions include beliefs that counseling doesn’t help, it takes forever to see results and is therefore too time consuming and expensive. For some, there is the misconception that counseling is a sign of personal weakness. As for horror stories, these are often related to relationships that fall apart despite counseling or having to learn about one’s role in untoward behavior or indeed a poor match between the persons seeking counseling and the methods of the counselor.

While the counselor is not there to label you crazy or bad, the counselor’s involvement will help you to examine your own behavior which with insight, you may feel poorly about initially. To this end, the counselor may also advise you about your behavior, attitudes or beliefs that interfere with or contribute to conflict or other emotional distress.

Learning about one’s own behavior and contribution to distress is meant to open the person up to learning new and more productive ways of managing their issues. As the person learns more effective strategies to cope with life events or manage interpersonal relationships, the person typically feels better about themselves and newfound abilities and the issues that brought the person to counseling in the first place may then resolve.

The length of counseling is often a function of the counselor’s approach and the openness to counseling of the person attending. The more negative a person is to counseling or the more the person feels trapped or coerced into attending, the more difficult and time consuming it can be. However, showing up is at times half the battle. Once in attendance, the resistance shown may dissipate and the skill of the counselor may facilitate a positive experience.

While some people see counseling as a sign of weakness, it should actually be considered a sophisticated means for addressing life’s pitfalls. By comparison, no one would consider it a sign of weakness to need the services of an accountant, dentist or mechanic. These are services available to oneself when one’s own skill set doesn’t match life’s demands. Similarly of counseling. We simply are not equipped to always manage whatever life throws at us. Counseling offers the opportunity to look under the hood, tinker and straighten things out to then move forward more successfully.

As for horror stories, this is true in any profession. Not all professionals are helpful to all persons in all circumstances. Not all cars can be repaired or all teeth saved. We also may not be happy with a tax bill or the cost of preparation. None of these circumstances are necessarily a reflection on the service provider though. So too with counseling. Counseling will not resolve all problems or save all relationships. To add, not all professionals have the same expertise.

Just like you can have a poorly skilled mechanic, accountant or dentist, the same is true of counselors. However, this doesn’t mean you will never get an oil change for your car again or never complete your taxes or address a toothache. It just means you need to choose your counselor with the same bit of wisdom that you would choose any other professional. That includes looking at websites, listening to other people’s experiences with their service providers, seeking a referral from your doctor, looking into employment benefits and/or asking friends or family for a referral.

As for cost, people really have to do their own cost analysis. Certainly counseling is for most a grudge spend, at least to start. Just like no one really looks forward to an expensive car repair bill or troublesome dentist visit for an aching tooth, it is reasonable that people would prefer to not have to attend counseling. Notwithstanding, most people are satisfied with their experience after the fact and appreciate the value of the service having attended.

There is only really one reason why anyone seeks and uses any professional service: to hopefully make things better when all other strategies have been exhausted.

If your life is challenging and you’ve exhausted all other options, before you ditch the car or tie your tooth to a string or think you can just avoid paying taxes, you see a professional. Consider the same of counseling. Sure the thought of going may be difficult, but think of the alternative. What if you don’t go? What if counseling may improve matters? You won’t know until you try.

If you tried it and didn’t like the experience, then try another counselor just as you would another mechanic, dentist or accountant. Sometimes though you may hear the same message delivered by multiple professionals. If this is the case, then it is time to consider the message.

In any case, if your life is not on track, counseling may help, as difficult as it may be to get there. Hopefully though if you need it you get there.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue. I am available in person and by Skype.

If you found this blog of service, please share it with the links below.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

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Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas and Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships

Divorce? Who Ya Gonna Call!

It’s January. Your relationship has flat-lined. Now who are you going to call?

January is known as divorce month, not because it is celebrated, but because it is the month when the greatest number of divorces are initiated. Maybe it’s because those who kept it together for Christmas can no longer keep it together or maybe it’s because that New Year’s kiss was stolen from the wrong person. In any event, January sees a peak in the number of divorce applications of any month in the year.

The real question is, given you are headed for divorce, who do you call to help you through the process? Most people would answer a divorce lawyer. However, they would be wrong to do so.

Typically in calling a divorce lawyer, you will be seen and your story will be heard on a one sided basis. Your lawyer will align with you and seek to get you the best deal in the settlement, but at what real cost.

In getting you your best deal, it naturally comes at the expense of your partner. Think about that for a moment. Would you or your partner ever want to think you are getting the raw end in a separation settlement? Of course not. So with that thinking, the fight is on. Your partner will “lawyer up” and before you know it, you have a contested divorce complete with the nasty letters going back and forth inflaming you both.

There is a better way.

Rather than having your divorce lawyer on speed dial, consider meeting with a divorce specialist who can meet with you both and help you resolve your separation as amicably as possible. With children involved consider how much better this would be for them. Divorce is already stressful enough, but even more so for everybody when acrimonious and contested.

By using a divorce specialist, you can find that elusive settlement where you both can sign off in agreement and stay in charge of the outcome – both winners and your children can be kept out of the fray.

To find a divorce specialist follow these easy steps:

  1. Go to Google;
  2. Type in “collaborative law” and your city, state or province;
  3. Check the search results for the nearest collaborative law organization and click on the link;
  4. Once on the site, look through the list of the family professionals and call a few. (The family professionals are also known as divorce coaches or mental health professionals in some areas.)

These are the people you want to start your separation process with. They can advise as to options for helping you further through the separation process. They will not take sides and they can help you figure out how to address concerns with children and other family and friends. Upon their involvement they can also refer you to Divorce Financial Professionals who can help you through the untangling of of financial issues and sort out child support as will spousal support.

Once the family and financial issues have been addressed, then either of these persons can refer you to Collaborative Legal Professionals who can finalize your settlement agreement, having been sorted out first by the appropriate specialists.

When you consider that most people will run to a divorce lawyer, paying hundreds of dollars more per hour, who don’t possess the specific expertise of the specialists costing far less per hour, it’s no wonder so many divorces are messy and expensive.

Just because your relationship didn’t work out doesn’t mean you can’t have a less acrimonious and less costly separation.

How you start matters and this year the start is already shaky if you are looking at divorce. Make good decisions now to facilitate your process as successfully as possible. Start with the right divorce professional.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue. I am available in person and by Skype.

If you found this blog of service, please share it with the links below.

https://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=200&h=301

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

Facebook
Linked In
Twitter

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas and Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships

8 Signs that Marijuana Use is Heading for Trouble

There is a new trend in terms of the impact of chronic marijuana use. It is known as cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome, or CHS. The symptoms include severe abdominal pain and vomiting. Common to those who suffer this impact is seeking relief through hot showers. As odd as all this may sound, it is true.

The remedy is simple. Cease using marijuana.

With the rise of medical and legal marijuana both in the US and Canada, this syndrome is starting to be seen more and more.

As my colleague, Dan McGann notes, “The daily chronic user appears to have increasing symptoms of cannabinoid hyperemesis along with low motivation and anxiety… lack of drive leading to low productivity, therefore low self-esteem – to isolation – to depression and anxiety and then more weed to self medicate and the cycle continues…”

Treating people who abuse marijuana is challenging. As another colleague notes of chronic marijuana users, “It is hard to penetrate the almost evangelical fervor with which they defend their drug and its use.”

Indeed, unlike other addictions, those who chronically abuse marijuana treat its use almost like a sacrament, holy in nature and yielding divine properties. These chronic users do not hide their marijuana use, but rather seem to cerebrate it all the while their lives fall off track. The common trajectory from a psycho-social perspective includes increasing isolation and depression. The depression is often masked by the fatiguing effects of the marijuana. The effects of chronic marijuana use do mimic depression with symptoms of lethargy, difficulty sleeping and lack of motivation.

How do you know if your loved one is suffering the effects of chronic marijuana use? Look for these signs:

  1. Openly extolling the virtue of the drug;
  2. Daily use;
  3. Increased fatigue, despondency and lethargy;
  4. Increasing inability to carry out the tasks of independent living;
  5. Increasing absences from work or school;
  6. Increasing isolation;
  7. Decreasing network of friends or increasing network of those with a similar disposition to marijuana;
  8. Increase in conflict with parents or those in authority such as at school or work.

If your loved one or friend is exhibiting these symptoms, it is likely they need considerable help to address their chronic marijuana use. These are not problems that typically resolve easily or on their own. Persons who are so taken by their chronic marijuana use often need external influence in order to address their behavior.

The person who is chronically using marijuana will likely be the last person to seek help. Hence help is often initially directed to the family to help cope and set boundaries, limits and expectations for acceptable behavior.

Concern is often expressed by the family for the inability of the chronic marijuana user to fend for themselves and hence some family members may express reluctance or fear about holding the user accountable and fear to have the user expelled from their home. While that level of intervention may be necessary in some cases, it is not necessary in all cases and care should be taken with vulnerable persons not to create more harm in the process.

Marijuana is not the harmless substance so many regular recreational and chronic users would like to have others believe. This is not to say it cannot be used recreationally, much like alcohol, but that there is a significant difference from occasional recreational use at safe times and the chronic use that leads to a cascade of psychological, emotional, behavioral, social, academic and vocational problems.

A significant sign of going down a dangerous path is extolling the virtues and evangelizing the drug use. Even by then, the road to recovery may be long and arduous.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship issue. I am available in person and by Skype.

If you found this blog of service, please share it with the links below.

https://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=200&h=301

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

Facebook
Linked In
Twitter

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas and Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships