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Parents of Children’s with Complex Needs During Covid-19: How are they doing?

The other day, I asked parents who follow my Facebook page and have kids with complex challenges, how they are all doing now, during the pandemic.

Complex challenges may be a mix of academic, behavioral, physical, developmental and health issues to varying degrees and combinations.

I received about 25 comments.

The comments were from both educators and parents. In some cases, the person responding was both an educator as well as parent of a child with special needs.

In some cases, the reply indicated that indeed, things were actually better with their child at home. With the stress of school reduced, their child was managing more easily. It was not that they were not necessarily learning, but able to do so in the peace and comfort of their residence.

However, many were worse off. There were reports of heightened anxiety and more troublesome behavior.

Educators were agreed in terms of worrying far less about meeting academic expectations than they were about facilitating children’s mental health. This was met with appreciation by parents.

Here are some of the comments:

  • Refusal to go to school or do work. Aggression up. Arguments up. It’s a nightmare.
  • Exhausted from all the fighting. My son needs lots of exercise. He needs to run and climb. We do parks, nature walks and running green box to green box on our sidewalk. He is still very spirited, but the lockdown time calmed him. His behaviors this year are less. Definitely not gone but more manageable. We still have bad days, but everyone has bad days. I need to work more on taking care of me so I can have more patience dealing with him.
  • For me, I really struggle with posts like this. Our education system is failing, our children our families our communities and our future. I want all people in education, families, all people that have a passion for healthy education to be fighting for better. This was a crisis before covid, and now with Covid, I don’t even know what to say. It is so sad. Everyone needs to stand up together and not be quiet about what is really going on, and that it isn’t okay.
  • Good thoughts and hugs to all with kids with challenges. Our son has ADHD and some mild anxiety. He is actually doing better with online learning than he did in class last year (Grade 7 now). He is starting to become more independent, still needs some nudges, and with his attention issues, he needs more time to finish assignments and the teachers don’t always understand that. He is a bit worried that he will struggle in high school, although he is very bright. Today, I’m here close to him, just keeping near, reading on the couch, while he works on an assignment and I’m here for moral support and any questions. Sometimes he just wants a sounding board. I’m very grateful that my husband and I are a good team on this. Gentle approach and a sense of humor, and God’s grace, every day. 
  • Coping day by day, sometimes hour by hour. Cherishing and celebrating the good days, even if that means half the day was good and the other half was trying. On the bad days, crying lol and apologizing A LOT to teachers but also advocating that this is not a neuro-normal child and that you cannot handle her bad moments the same way you do someone who is not neuro diverse. Helpful services, York Hills is fantastic, we are also in the process of setting up a psycho-educational assessment to ensure we are working with the correct diagnosis and that we didn’t miss any LD’s while working to set up behavioral assistance. What do I need? To know I’m not alone. To know that other parents are struggling the same, are exhausting themselves advocating for services, are questioning the short and long term effects of virtually every decision they make. Because sometimes this path feels very isolating.
  • We took the opportunity for our son to do online learning. His brother returned to school. He is doing so much better – but I know that right now, all we are doing is taking triggers away. We are focusing on building confidence and good work habits, which is great, but we aren’t addressing is his lack of control in the face of adversity. One thing at a time, I guess. Last year, neither was being addressed. I’m tired… I’m finally rocking grade 4 math, though!!! Strategies: we can snack when we want, we can sit on the floor or at the desk or stand up, we can have a blanket or stuffy with us – basically whatever makes us feel comfortable and secure. Services here are laughable. My son was doing great with his psychologist, but she isn’t able to hold in-person sessions yet, and the online ones weren’t helping him at all. So… there’s nothing right now for him. How am I? Mixed bag. Happy that he is achieving great things that were completely out of reach for him in the classroom. Scared that he won’t be able to return to the classroom after the pandemic because we got too comfortable doing it from home. Burnt out being with him basically 24-7. Confused as to if I’m doing things right or wrong. Grateful that I have this opportunity to have good experiences and spend extra time with him.
  • As a teacher of students with complex needs (mental health, academic, behavioral), I am seeing magnified struggles this year. The kids are NOT alright. Very little is happening academically with my students as the significant mental health, behavioral and increased attendance concerns prevent them from accessing curriculum. As a teacher, my first concern is supposed to be academic achievement. In reality, my focus is on keeping them safe, somewhat engaged with trusting adults, and focusing on strategies to cope with their social and emotional struggles.

School, for many parents, provides respite from the exhaustion of providing care to children that frequently require continuous attention, either due to behavior, mental health issues and/or physical and health considerations. While some had access to supportive resources, others did not. Some parents themselves were or getting burnt out.

These parents and children are often unseen and unheard. They represent a minority of parents and children in the education system. However, their needs are many.

Hopefully, this article extends their voice so they and their children may be heard, understood and supported.


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I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

Video-Conferencing Precautions. Yeah… Don’t get caught…

The result of the pandemic, video conferencing has taken off.

It is the go-to for meetings across distances, bringing folks together where otherwise contact would have been more challenging.

However, how prepared are you before joining that meeting? How about your client?

Here are some tips you may use in whole or part when establishing a meeting using video conferencing:

For the Professional:

  • Mind your permissions. Determine in advance who has permission to share content, post information, record and control the video and audio of others.
  • Be mindful of your dress and background.
  • Be mindful of privacy on your end and who may be able to hear in your physical location. Confidentiality includes who may overhear this meeting from your space.
  • Determine in advance on behalf of the client if there are any safety or privacy issues in their setting.
  • Have a contact number and address in the event of an untoward circumstance requiring assistance.
  • Determine any other parameters for the meeting, such as who shall attend.
  • During the meeting, one may be forgetful that audio and video may continue, particularly during breaks. Always be mindful of behavior and conversation/comments.

For the Client:

  • Be mindful that the professional addresses responsibilities on their end.
  • Manage the privacy in your setting.
  • If discussing issues that could put you at risk of harm, make sure you are safe to do so and if necessary, have a safety plan in place.
  • Remember, you may be heard or seen, even in a break.
  • Make sure your device is charged or plugged in to maintain contact.
  • If connecting from your home, consider how much of your private space you want to reveal.

Following these tips is not a guarantee of safety. However, being mindful about privacy, confidentiality and safety can go a long way to reducing risks.


Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

This One Feeling Can Trigger a Lot – Abandonment

For many, the issue is abandonment.

That sense or feeling or thought of being cut adrift.

It can come on if feeling ignored, dismissed, not cared about.

Someone leaving in anger can also trigger it.

It’s not uncommon for that sense of abandonment to have roots in early childhood, not having been reasonably cared for by a parent, having experienced only conditional love.

It is an awful feeling though for some.

When felt it creates tension. If recognized by another though, it can intentionally be used as a tool of manipulation.

Some folks who experience this challenge with the sense of abandonment if caused by a parent, may find themselves still seeking to feel safe and valued by that parent. This can place them, even in adulthood, continually hurt again and again as the parent withholds affection and responsibility.

Counseling can help bring perspective and help manage the big feelings that often lead to upset and even acting out.

If in a relationship, it is also helpful for one’s partner to learn about these underlying issues so they can better support too.

When one understands and begins to manage their own sense of security and value, those feelings can subside.


Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

https://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=200&h=301

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

The Narcissist and The Garden

Life with a Narcissist: Beginning, Middle, End

You are food to the narcissist and like every good gardener, the narcissist wants the relationship to grow, so they may be fed.

You are cared for, held, nurtured. Indeed, it feels nurturing. Charm is often the grow food to these relationships. Possessiveness takes reign. As one tends ones garden, the fruits are for oneself. You grow beyond, love that is possessive feels smothering and restrictive.

The fruits spoil and the gardener angers.

Greater attempt to nurture, possess and hold are met with resistance. Resistance begets more anger. The dance takes hold. The garden spoils.

Seeking life anew, the garden seeks self-care or perhaps the safety of another tender.

The loss to the gardener is unacceptable. The gardener fights for their possession or else to spoil and render ungrowable so that no other shall enjoy that felt to be rightly theirs.

It ends.

With weeds and weak stock, what is left is left to regrow and renew.

Nurture and it will grow again.

Life with a narcissist. It has a beginning, middle and for some, an end. The end facilitates a new beginning.

The moral; be one’s own gardener.

Be responsible for one’s own well being, then feel free to share with those who share in return.


Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

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Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

We Do Our Best…

Coping…..

The days grow short.

The worries grow tall.

Many do with less.

We worry about the fall.

A season’s change.

We again rearrange.

The virus grows.

We shrink before the snows.

Weary we are.

We seek to avoid.

The pain of isolation.

The wonder of indoctrination.

Fatigue, it is real.

Our minds need to heal.

My breath I do take.

Perhaps for heaven’s sake.

Quietly I lay.

My thoughts they do wake.

We’ve been here before.

We seek to be safe.

Our reserves we must find.

We must take hold of our mind.

We quieten the noise.

We rise.

We rise with the day.

We do what we do.

We live in each moment.

We take hold of each breath.

Our world has changed.

We rise from our rest.

We do our best.


Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

https://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=200&h=301

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

When The Parent Is a Narcissist

Growing up with a parent who is a narcissist is sheer hell.

The existence of the child is all about affirming the existence of that parent. This is topsy-turvy world.

It is supposed to be the parent who affirms and create a safe place for the child to grow, develop, learn from mistakes, explore and find their own passion in life.

However, the narcissist parent requires themselves to be the passion of the child and for the child’s development to be about the forever positive reflection of that parent.

When the child does not fulfil that imperative, the child is scorned, rejected, belittled, punished. And to be clear, no child can fulfill that imperative as it is not the way of normal healthy human development. This child needing parental love, safety and approval for healthy development then subordinates their needs to the agrandizement of the parent hoping to one day be validated as a valued individual as every human seeks. With that dynamic, the narcissist parent holds a psychological grip on the child and the child becomes tied to that parent either never separating from them and achieving independence or running away to save a shred of self or being overcome in mental health or addiction issues. It is difficult to emerge unscathed.

To emerge unscathed, as amazingly some do, it is often the result of someone outside the immediate family circus who shows a positive interest in the child, someone whose nurturing or guidance offers a glimpse what can be. However, these kids can also fall prey to others, recognizing their vulnerability and using it for exploitation. These parasitic types can fake their nurturing and empathy to entrap the child of the narcissist and then use that child, almost at any age for selfish gain, again bringing harm.

There are those adult children who have escaped the grasp of the narcissistic parent, who have managed to set some boundary or even clean break. Some by the grace of God, others the result of good therapy and other by the positive and selfless care of another.

If you are the child of such a parent and are still in pain, do seek help and guidance for yourself. If you are married to an adult child of a narcissist parent you may be experiencing the turmoil in their life. Learning more of these issues and couple counseling can be helpful.

If you are a friend of a person who is an adult child of a narcissistic parent and witness their distress or their need to separate from that parent or other family members, don’t judge. Appreciate they are seeking to extricate and find the independence and safety that should have been theirs for a long time.

The road can be long.

The way, winding.

Find your way.

You are of value independent of that parent.


Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

https://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=200&h=301

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

ADHD

Please don’t hit me.

Please do not berate me.

It is as if I cannot stop myself.

It is like an itch that when felt immediately draws my hand to scratch it.

I do not mean to do wrong. I do not want to be seen as bad.

When hit, when berated, it is as if I see myself in that moment as a beast, undeserving of love.

It adds to my inner turmoil yet I can still not resist the urge to scratch, to act, to go quickly where my mind takes me, even if contrary to your wishes.

Believe it or not, your wishes for my better behavior are my wishes too. However, no matter how hard I wish, I cannot seem to resist.

And then I am hit again. Berated again.

I am a jumble. Unlovable. Bad.

ADHD It is not willful. Indeed, that is why it is a disorder.

Punishment doesn’t make it go away.

Instead, know I mean well. Redirect me.

Help me to problem solve. Practice self management along with me.

Take joy in the smallest of my accomplishment and better days.

Build me up.


Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

https://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=200&h=301

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

Who Were Your Parents?

It can be a challenge, but at some point we must come to a realistic appraisal of our parents.

For some this may mean coming to terms with abusive behavior, racism, misogyny, addictions, infidelity, power and control issues.

This realization may change the quality and context of your relationship. You may find yourself distancing or being excluded.

It can be a rough realization leaving you feeling alone or like you may lose grandparents to your children. You may find yourself grieving the loss of the parents you thought you had or wished you had.

This truly is an adjustment. However, this leads to emotional freedom, independence, maturity and wisdom.

The behaviors you have or are coming to realize, are not healthy, undermine your relationships with others contribute to mental illness.

Breathe.

Consider your boundaries. Think about your relationship with your partner and the wellbeing of your children.

This realization may just be the most important change of your life.


Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

https://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=200&h=301

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

And with therapy, later in life….

She always felt responsible for her parents relationship.

When they fought, she would step in-between. She became one parent’s confident who would pour too much information into her about adult matters.

As news of an impending separation came, she felt she had to try harder.

This was the start of her anxiety, worried about what to do next and what might come. Things were far from her control. Thinking that if perhaps she was good enough, her parents would be less stressed. Needing control of something, she plunged herself into schoolwork thinking good grades may be her answer.

While her parents were united in seeking treatment for off the rails anxiety coming out as perfectionism, their relationship was no better off.

However, no matter what she did to help or the stories she listened too, could save her parent’s marriage. She felt a failure and with that came depression. Depression on top of anxiety. Sadly, both parents blamed the other for their daughter’s distress and then fought over her treatment, who should be the counselor and if there should be medication.

As she got older she had a hard time with her own relationships, never feeling quite secure, always seeking to appease, caught up with an anxiety that anchored itself in always needing to be busy. It was a distraction from unresolved guilt masquerading as a continual quest for success.

Truth was, she never felt quite adequate given all attention growing up was always on her parents with little towards her own needs for love and validation. Her parents were too distracted by their forever conflict.

Eventually she entered counseling at a point when her adult life and intimate relationship were crashing.

For once she had time to pause, reflect and learn.

She learned that in her quest to manage her parent’s relationship, there was little attention for her and hence a positive self esteem was lacking. She also learned that her role, feeling responsible for her parent’s relationship was a set up for failure. Although she internalized a sense of responsibility, she had neither control or authority and that anxiety and depression would naturally flow as a result.

Eventually she learned to let go those feelings of defeat and worthlessness for having failed in her quest. She came to understand that her issues were built in structurally given the dynamics of her family and role within.

She came to also realize that she had value and could do for herself, have expectations of others and look for reciprocity in relationships.

There was a wisdom that came with time, as well as a patience, not just with others, but herself too.

When she let go her quests, tensions faded and success then was achievable.

She also learned that instead of taking on responsibility for everyone’s issues, she must allow them space to find their way and to be there only to encourage rather than control. With that, resistance and conflict with others faded too.

She was grateful for having entered counseling, gaining perspective and struggling to reflect and change old habits.

Perhaps her best lesson was that it is not about what others must do, but about what one must do themselves, even when it appears the issue of the other.


Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

https://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=200&h=301

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.

And That’s Why We Rely on Science.

One of the biggest errors one can make is mistaking one’s own experience for that of others.

We all have different experiences.

That is why we rely on science.

Science looks for patterns, commonalities, connections that may connect events, that may help us see if something actually causes something else.

When we act on belief alone, we may be making assumptions that inadvertently create harm.

Some folks complain that scientists change their mind.It’s not that they change their mind, it is that new data may change our understanding as to the connection between events, what causes what.

That shows flexibility and growth, very different from rigidly holding an opinion on the basis of a belief or a personal experience alone.

So, an opinion may represent a personal point of view and even a personal experience, but that doesn’t tell us what may be of benefit to much larger groups of people.

Health policy therefore aims to provide for the greatest good to the greatest amount of people.Health policy needs to be supported by good social policy and then we need good fiscal policy to achieve the others as responsibly as possible.

Sadly, health, social and fiscal policy can all be tremendously influenced by greed, racism, discrimination and prejudice.

I seek policy based on science to provide for the greatest good for the most people and based on compassion and inclusion.


Follow me on Facebook!

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker. Check out all my services and then call me if you need help with a personal issue, mental health concern, child behavior or relationship, divorce or separation issue or even help growing your practice. I am available in person and by video conferencing.

https://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=200&h=301

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

gary@yoursocialworker.com
www.yoursocialworker.com for counseling and support

www.garydirenfeld.com – to build your successful practice

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, former parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Georgina Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America. He consults to mental health professionals as well as to mediators and collaborative law professionals about good practice as well as building their practice.