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Your Feelings May Betray You.

Many people enter into therapy advising of a whole host of feelings. Then on the basis of those feelings, they rationalize their behavior. For some of these people, having a feeling creates a sense of entitlement and excuses inappropriate behavior.

“I deserve xyz” is a common refrain, as is “I felt like it”, or even “I was angry at the time”; or simply, “that is what I felt”… therefore it legitimizes whatever I have done.

In these circumstances, we speak of poor judgement. What is meant by this is when we allow a feeling to dictate or legitimize behavior where the behavior hasn’t been thought through and in particular when the behavior, on the basis of that feeling creates further distress for self or another.

Unfortunately some people’s feelings actually betray them. Their feelings may be disproportionate to a triggering event; their feelings may be based on a misperception of the triggering event; or in the case of some people, their feelings may not be of a sufficient intensity to appropriately register and respond to the triggering event.

Past traumatic experiences such as exposure to violent events (childhood or otherwise, intra or extra-familial), shock, neglect, family dysfunction, parental alcoholism, are all known to skew feelings.

The person subject to those kind of events may have a heightened sensitivity or alternately be desensitized such that when feelings occur, the feeling may not be truly representative of the experience. Hence, people may overreact, under-react and even inappropriately react. Interestingly, this is true even of persons who do not recognize themselves to have been subject to traumatic events, yet have been.

The role of therapy is to help put past events into a more realistic perspective and understand the role of those events on how we feel and then by extension, how we behave. By understanding the connection between past events affecting feelings upon present experiences, the person can then think about the feelings and more realistically appraise the current situation before responding. This is really what is meant by seeking good or better judgement.

If you find yourself in ongoing conflict with others, where your actions are accused as contributory, you may want to explore your feelings and where they come from with the view to determining if your feelings are betraying you in any manner. Thereafter if your feelings are betraying you, you can learn more cognitive strategies for reappraising your feelings and determining an appropriate course of action.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker.

http://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=200&h=301

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

(905) 628-4847

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

http://www.facebook.com/GaryDirenfeldSocialWorker
http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=60758978&trk=tab_pro
https://twitter.com/socialtworker

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships.

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In Lieu of Court and Hardball Litigators

If you are separating or divorcing, there are good reasons you don’t want to go to court and why you want to avoid hardball, winner take all litigators.

The reason to stay away from court is to avoid the win/lose mentally of settling a case. The reason you want to stay away from the win/lose outcome is because in the end, very often both parties subject to the litigation wind up losing. The question is, how can that be?

It goes like this.

When you go to court and put your life into the hands of a third party who makes decisions over your life, you can rest assured that the decision, good or bad, will not be as well crafted as you may craft yourself because that person will never have all the intimate details of your life.

The other and perhaps the more important reason why so many court imposed outcomes fail, is that no one likes being the loser. No one likes holding the “dirty” end of the stick.

While you may be thrilled to have won, consider the psychology of the other. That person is likely to feel hard done by and resentful. How well does someone who feels resentful follow rules to which they are opposed?

Resentment begs revenge and the nature of the revenge is to undo whatever was imposed against their favor. That means that the “winner” now has a huge target painted on their back and the “loser” is seeking to take them down to re-right their view of an imposed wrong.

You may not even see your opponent coming as revenge can go underground and come back in passive aggressive strategies or subtle and sometimes not so subtle strategies of undermining behavior.

Winner/Loser? Now both have lost as you are embroiled in an ongoing battle of undoing perceived injustices. This is hardly ever a favorable outcome.

Keep the lawyers from being central as they too, fighting on your behalf are more often at tremendous risk of only ratcheting up your conflict. Sadly enough, this occurs amidst the conflict of interest where your intensifying conflict is directly related to their financial gain.

Instead of the folly of litigation, Court imposed outcomes and lawyer assisted or directed negotiation, consider those strategies that facilitate negotiation between the opposing parties themselves.

Those strategies include collaborative law and mediation.

At least in collaborative law, while you have tremendous lawyer support, the parties subject to the dispute are central to the process and always present in every negotiation. In other words, you remain in control throughout, although assisted and guided by your lawyers.

In mediation, you get to work with a single neutral facilitator to help you craft your agreement. Bear in mind, the mediator will be neutral with respect to the final outcome of your agreement. However the mediator will not be neutral with regard to respect and safety. There the mediator will seek to facilitate a safe and courteous environment within which to carry out your work. In so doing, the mediator very often also serves as coach to help improve separating couples communicate more effectively between themselves. This is very useful for maintaining that ongoing relationship as co-parents.

While your collaborative lawyers are expert at law, you can chose a mediator with expertise directly related to your area of dispute so that the mediator can provide information and guidance to help achieve an agreement consistent with your needs, interests and the well being of your children.

In the end, it is not just the agreement that is reached, but the likelihood of the parties honoring the agreement over the passage of time. It may be more advantageous to craft a less than perfect agreement to which both persons buy into and to which both can maintain, than an agreement that suits primarily one that will likely crash and burn anyways.

Statistically, more than 95% of most matters settle prior to a trial, so why not spend your time and less money by going directly to those strategies that avoid court and the escalation of conflict?

You still want your lawyer, chose collaboratively trained lawyers and enter a collaborative law process. Want to preserve greater costs and be the most central figures in your settlement, chose mediation.

Want a lawsuit that will cost countless thousands of dollars and take years to settle chose litigious lawyers and go to court.

Not sure when you really may need to litigate? Consider domestic violence, serious mental health issues or criminal behavior. In the absence of those issues, and indeed often even in the presence of those issues, the alternative strategies might very well still be your preferred strategies.

This Judgement by Justice Pazaratz really sums up these issues.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker.

http://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=200&h=301

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

(905) 628-4847

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

http://www.facebook.com/GaryDirenfeldSocialWorker
http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=60758978&trk=tab_pro
https://twitter.com/socialtworker

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships.

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Parenting Guts

My wife and I were talking about some friends the other day. At issue was their inability to hold their kids accountable to respectable behavior. Whenever their kids acted rudely or didn’t listen, one of the parents would offer a lame excuse and essentially the child was let off the hook. With the kid’s face buried in a screen, the parents were effectively dismissed.

My wife surmised that one or both parents were afraid of their kids’ push-back. Technically I refer to this as protest behavior – the behavior of the child seeking to undo the directive or expectation of the parent. The push-back or protest behavior can come in the form of a tantrum, an escalation of out of control behavior, violence, withdrawal, talking back, incessant arguing or emotional manipulation (you don’t love me… you are hurting me… my friend’s dad let them do…).

As the parent acquiesces to the protest behavior, the child feels emboldened and learns that such behavior works to undo the parental expectation. The untoward behavior thus continues.

My wife, not a social worker, just cut to the chase and said, “That parent has no parenting guts”.

Parenting guts. What a concept.

In today’s multi-screen universe where kids whine for increased connectivity to the Internet and portability of devices, so many more kids are getting into trouble and accessing information far beyond their maturity to handle.

As we seem to be developing an increasingly spoiled generation of kids whose manners or help around the house appears to be a diminishing capacity, maybe it is time to think in terms of parenting guts.

Parenting guts.

As your child whines about the access to technology their friends have and seek to have you pick up the tab for their premium cell plan, maybe it’s time for parental push-back.

Really? You think a cell phone makes them safer? Think again. It just may offer them up as a target for theft, on-line bullying or worse, exploitation!

Since when is the rantings of the child, holding the parent hostage by comparisons to the trappings of other spoiled kids a rationale for giving in?

So what if your kid doesn’t like the parental expectation (assuming reasonable) and they whine? Would any of those strategies work for you at your place of employment for getting a raise or advancement?

I like my wife’s new term.

In today’s world, more parents need parenting guts. If the child’s behavior wouldn’t be acceptable at your place of employment, it shouldn’t be acceptable from your kids at home.

Now this is not permission for abusive parenting, but permission for parents to withstand the push-back of their children and teaching them the value of respect, listening, working for their own things and giving back to others.

As these parents develop their parenting guts, then their kids can grow to be the healthy, moral and reasonable adults they would want them to be.

Turn off the Internet at dinner time; have time for chores; make sure the homework gets done; limit the video games; address rude or disrespectful behavior; enjoy some family time.

As your kids are now is how they will likely be come adulthood. Would anyone in the outside world tolerate such attitudes and behavior? Would their behavior be acceptable in an intimate adult relationship? Just what kind of adult do you want your child to be?

The alternative? Spoiled brats who grow into narcissistic adults.

You choose.

I think my wife got this right. Have some parenting guts.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker.

http://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=200&h=301

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

(905) 628-4847

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

http://www.facebook.com/GaryDirenfeldSocialWorker
http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=60758978&trk=tab_pro
https://twitter.com/socialtworker

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships.

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Alcoholic? Quitting is only the beginning.

People who drink to excess, where their drinking causes distress to others, are frequently caught in a web of denial and minimization. These persons are unable to see or unable to admit that their drinking is adversely affecting their own life and that of others. Typically, this person excuses their drinking by pointing fingers at persons who are worse than them as if that makes their drinking less consequential. They also may excuse their drinking by blaming others for contributing to their need to drink. An apology for their drinking and impact on others is out of the question. That would mean assuming some degree of responsibility.

When the pressure to stop drinking is greater than the desire to drink, or when one finally feels so poorly about their drinking, one may finally cease to consume alcohol. An understanding of the alcoholism however does not motivate their cessation. The motivation tends to be the desire to avoid further criticism or consequences, such as the loss of a relationship or job. Thus these persons may quit the drink, but their thinking about themselves and others goes unchanged. These persons are still apt to project blame onto others, deny their own issues that are contributory to distress and minimize their untoward behaviour. An apology for the impact of their drinking and behaviour on others is still out of the question.

To the spouse or partner of the drinker, their life also continues unchanged. In view of the ongoing blaming, denial and minimization, the spouse or partner may believe they are somehow the source of their mutual distress. That the drinker has ceased drinking may actually make matters worse in this regard as the alcohol cannot no longer be directly blamed for the relationship problems. The spouse or partner may be bamboozled into believing the nonsense of the drinker.

So the drinking ends, but not much else changes.

Alcoholism, while certainly about problematic drinking is also about the thinking and behavior of the problematic drinker. Unless the associated thinking and behavior is addressed, relationship problems continue and may in fact worsen. They may worsen because the partner is no longer able to blame the drinking directly and the alcoholic may thus project more blame on the behavior of the partner rather than on himself or herself. These drinkers are apt to be controlling of others, directly or indirectly abusive and they are certainly apt to put their needs ahead of others while making everyone else out to be the source of problems.

Treatment for drinkers must include addressing the associated thinking and behavior. In addition, the partner or spouse is also advised to seek support to understand the dynamics of their relationship such that they can withstand the thinking and behavior of the drinker, stand up for themselves, hold the drinker accountable and make decisions now in their own interest as opposed to the interest of the drinker. These matters can be addressed in couple or marital counseling as long as the counselor is trained in couple or marital counseling and has knowledge and expertise with alcoholism and addictions.

In addition to couple or marital counseling, are programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous and Al-Anon and Alateen. The benefits of these programs are in helping the drinker understand their thinking and behavior and the impact on others so that they may take responsibility and make changes. The benefit of Al-Anon and Alateen is to help family members also understand the thinking and behavior they have been subject to and how to manage and cope in view of the thinking and behavior of the drinker.

So while quitting problem drinking is a first step, without further treatment and support, the problems associated with the thinking and behavior of the drinker may continue and may worsen.

To make a lasting and positive difference, seek help to address the underlying problems of thinking and behavior. This is recommended for the drinker and the partner or spouse and other family members.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker.

http://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=497

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

(905) 628-4847

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

http://www.facebook.com/GaryDirenfeldSocialWorker
http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=60758978&trk=tab_pro
https://twitter.com/socialtworker

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships.

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Protocol for Student Interview Requests

Several times per week I receive requests from social work students throughout the US and Canada to interview me as a social worker.

The interview request is an assignment and the student has to write a paper on the basis of the interview. The assignment is to help acquaint the student with information pertaining to the role, job and employment of social workers. All in all, this is a good exercise for the student or person considering entering the profession.

The request usually beings with the student sending an email, seeking permission to interview and asking if he or she can send a few questions to be answered by email. As per my experience, when I say yes, I then receive an email with 5 to 20 questions, all of which could take 30 to 60 minutes to answer fully. The request is often presented with a matter of urgency, as if the assignment was left to near the final deadline for submission. Often the request is poorly grammatically structured, punctuated and there are numerous spelling mistakes.

Needless-to-say, I simply cannot respond to these requests of my time. To reduce the requests, I have advised students that a condition of my consent is that I receive a copy of their paper. With that I rarely receive their questionnaire. If I do however, I rarely receive a copy of their paper as would be promised. If I do receive a paper, it often looks like a cut and paste job of the email I provided. This leaves me feeling like I have completed the student’s assignment and rarely does the student extend appreciation once my reply is provided.

On a go-forward basis, those students who seek to interview me must have their teacher/ professor/instructor contact me in advance to discuss the terms of the interview (number of questions, time to respond, copy of the report, reasonably written request, expression of gratitude) before I will consent to the interview. In other words, the student doesn’t only need to learn about the profession, but how to reasonably make requests of other professionals.

I am happy to oblige and give back to the profession with the teacher/professor/instructor appreciating the commitment involved and the necessity of their student’s preparation and impact on the interviewees time and energy.

Teacher/professor/instructor – If you would like my availability to meet the needs of your students, please call first to discuss. The entire process should provide for the student’s development.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker.

http://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=497

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

(905) 628-4847

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

http://www.facebook.com/GaryDirenfeldSocialWorker
http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=60758978&trk=tab_pro
https://twitter.com/socialtworker

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships.

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Assess the Lawyer Before Accepting the Referral!

Parenting Coordination is a high-bred service for separated parents who are apt to find themselves in ongoing conflict. The PC (Parenting Coordinator) acts in the role of coach, educator, mediator and depending on jurisdiction, arbitrator. Utilizing those roles, the PC seeks to help parents disengage from the turmoil and conflict, learn new and improved skills for communication and advance the needs of their children above unresolved anger or animosity.

Central to the efficacy of the PC service is the disposition of the lawyer. This is something I have written about previously. However, I have recently come to conclude that as much as the PC must assess the parents in order to facilitate service, the PC must also assess the disposition of the lawyer prior to accepting the referral. The PC must be assured that the lawyer will not act in such a way so as to only transfer their zealous advocacy to this new arena as to do so is typically contradictory to the goals of PC.

To that end, I have added the following information on my website with regard to this service:

———————

While I am usually accepting new referrals, I have recently decided to be better informed about the respective clients’ legal representation before agreeing to accept the referral.

If the lawyers are themselves litigious by nature and apt to provide zealous advocacy then the forum of parenting coordination only becomes a less formal battleground than the Court. This is contrary to the goals of parenting coordination and does not bode well for good outcomes. In other words, the lawyer’s disposition to the pc service and the service of their client is a factor in the pc’s ability to be helpful.

To that end, I must chat with the lawyers on both sides to understand their approach to service to determine compatibility with the Parenting Coordination service.

———————-

Let’s see who refers now.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker.

http://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=497

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

(905) 628-4847

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

http://www.facebook.com/GaryDirenfeldSocialWorker
http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=60758978&trk=tab_pro
https://twitter.com/socialtworker

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships.

Amazon US

Amazon Canada

Calling All Family Law Litigators

Have you ever worried about the impact of litigation on your client, the opposing client or their children? In the run up to court, are you stressed out, short tempered or more likely to consume alcohol? Have you ever laid awake at night contemplating the impact of a missive sent earlier in the day or strategically planning how to respond in kind only with more intensity to a missive you received the day prior? If attacking a service provider in an attempt to mitigate the impact of a report on your client, have you ever felt remorse, concerned for impacting that person’s sense of self or livelihood, yet soldier on? Does your work intrude on your sleep or dreams? Do you find yourself distracted by your work with your intimate partner complaining about the impact of your work upon you or your relationship? Have any of the above issues been getting worse with time?

Family law litigation is a bit like carpentry with only a hammer. All matters get pounded and considering this scenario takes two to work, then there are two family litigators pounding it out with respective clients concerned about who can be the most vicious to thus win the fight. If you were coming back from fighting in a war abroad and experienced the symptoms noted above, having taken a pounding as good as you gave, having witnessed the impact of same upon those your serve, having then experienced some degree of emotional distress, there is a good likelihood you would be diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

What if though, you could represent your client, without battle, with due concern for the impact of the outcome on the client’s extended kin and on-going relationships? What if you didn’t have to send dramatic bombarding missives having to then sit back and anticipate the return volley? What if you had an expanded tool box that permitted face to face discussion with opposing counsel where opposing counsel turned into a collaborator out for the common good? What if you could feel satisfaction at not having won by trashing the other parent of someone’s children.

Many litigators eschew Collaborative Family Law, but quite frankly, I am not here to banter on the pitfalls or merits of either process. I am only here to offer family law litigators the possibility of a larger toolbox as well as the possibility for achieving greater personal satisfaction from their work and mitigating, to whatever degree possible, those structures that lead to the PTSD of the litigator.

Collaborative Family Law has long been presented as a kinder more gentle way of facilitating the dissolution of intimate relationships where the parties’ finances, assets and other relationships are intertwined and in particular when parent-child relationships will survive the dissolution of the intimate partnership.

Training in Collaborative Family Law, teaches the attendees to work together with a common purpose, appreciating that long after the intimate partner dissolution, the parenting relationship will long continue and as co-parents, this redefined partnership must be successful in order to produce a good outcome for the joint progeny. If one parent does not or cannot survive, then the probability of a good outcome for their joint progeny diminishes. It becomes a matter of fact that for children to achieve and manage well post parental separation, both parents must manage and survive the separation process intact, if not even more capable at the end of that process.

Collaborative Family Law simply expands the set of tools available to the litigator to achieve those better outcomes. Not all matters require a hammer and to bring a hammer to a matter that requires a saw or a drill or a wrench, is only likely to inflict damage. While stalwarts of Collaborative Family Law may at times appear to the litigators as born again lawyers, proselytizing and seeking converts to take on the mission of this process option, the truth is that many lawyers come to investigate Collaborative Family Law to secretly mitigate the impact of litigation that contributes to symptoms of PTSD.

Contrary to the beliefs of the many stalwarts of Collaborative Family Law, this is not a panacea to the ills of the justice system and the impact of litigation upon the parties subject to the litigation or the litigators themselves. This is but one more set of tools to expand one’s repertoire such that the solution chosen might better match the needs and circumstances of the participants.

To someone like myself, I can only tell you that I appreciate working more with lawyers who are Collaboratively trained, whether or not the particular case is run strictly Collaboratively with a participation agreement in place. I find that those lawyers who have taken the Collaborative training are more apt to act in the shadow of the strictly Collaborative style, meaning they do not send demanding or demeaning missives, they are likely to request face to face meetings to resolve matters peacefully and they are apt to more hold their client accountable to better behavior rather than simply defending known untoward behavior. Collaboratively trained litigators are thus more likely to ratchet down conflict and help their clients achieve peaceful reasonable outcomes making for durable agreements. With that, I am confident these collaboratively trained litigators sleep better and eventually heal from the impact of strict litigation process that can inflict as much harm to others as well as themselves as litigators, as the problems it purports to solve.

As a litigator, you may wonder if you would be welcomed into the Collaborative tent.

I can only tell you that almost all Collaboratively trained lawyers were former litigators.

You would be welcome to poke your nose in. Who knows, with time and worst case scenario, you may find yourself completely in the tent with those aforementioned symptoms all but forgotten. Further, you may enjoy the experience of having witnessed whole families transition into new structures that allow for the common good and well-being of the children bringing peace to your own sleep and relationships.

It all starts by attending training to only expand your toolbox. We welcome you.

I am Gary Direnfeld and I am a social worker.

http://garydirenfeld.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gary-feb-12.jpg?w=497

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

(905) 628-4847

gary@yoursocialworker.com
http://www.yoursocialworker.com

http://www.facebook.com/GaryDirenfeldSocialWorker
http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=60758978&trk=tab_pro
https://twitter.com/socialtworker

Gary Direnfeld is a social worker. Courts in Ontario, Canada, consider him an expert in social work, marital and family therapy, child development, parent-child relations and custody and access matters. Gary is the host of the TV reality show, Newlywed, Nearly Dead, parenting columnist for the Hamilton Spectator and author of Marriage Rescue: Overcoming the ten deadly sins in failing relationships. Gary maintains a private practice in Dundas Ontario, providing a range of services for people in distress. He speaks at conferences and workshops throughout North America.

If your relationship is faltering, then set it as your priority.

Read: Marriage Rescue: Overcoming ten deadly sins in failing relationships.

Amazon US

Amazon Canada

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